After KellyAnn Conway went on Meet The Press and uttered the phrase “Alternative Facts” with a straight face, I thought it would be interesting to post one alternative fact per day for the duration of the administration.

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After KellyAnn Conway went on Meet The Press and talked about “Alternative Facts,” I thought it would be interesting to post one alternative fact per day for the duration of the administration

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Ask an immigrant

February 3, 2017

I posted this as a response to someone and I think it bears repeating and expanding a little.

as an immigrant, someone who has been through the process (including being denied re-admission and spending the night in a detention center in an orange jumpsuit), i’d like to point out a couple of issues that no one seems to be addressing.

1. Permanent Residents (green card holders) who are/were out of the country are being denied re-admission and forced to sign documents to give up their permanent resident status. There are only a few reasons for revoking permanent resident status and outside of a felony conviction, they generally require an order from an immigration judge for which the petitioner should be present.

1b. The Permanent Resident process requires at least two in person interviews, usually takes two or three years to complete and runs somewhere in the vicinity of $5,000-8,000 in fees without the use of a lawyer. This process also requires multiple sets of paperwork to be filed. There are the initial application forms, change of address forms, biographic information forms. Any error, either deliberately or by omission will usually result in your application being denied and the process beginning again. Additionally, permanent residents are fingerprinted and photographed on multiple occasions and required to have a physical at USCIS appointed doctors only.

2. any one that was in transit and arrived in the US when the EO was rolled out and denied admission at that time cannot reenter the country or apply for a new visa without a waiver for 5-10 years, at least.

2b. Refugee visas require more in-person interviews than Permanent Residents, and include interviews with the FBI.

People believe immigration to the US is a simple process. It is not. It is a multi-year, highly intrusive and in some cases, expensive process during which every facet of your life is under a microscope. Saying we haven’t been vetted is insulting both to immigrants and the people that do the work. #askanimmigrant

Yearning to be free…

January 28, 2017

I didn’t emigrate to the US out of fear or to escape an oppressive regime. I emigrated for love, and I jumped through a lot of hoops. I cannot begin to imagine what it must be like to wait on the slowly turning wheels of bureaucracy while in fear for your life.

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be a light in the darkness

December 25, 2016

whatever you are celebrating this time of year or even if you’re not celebrating, it is worth remembering the intent of the season – light triumphing over the darkness. 

be a light in the darkness, for yourself, for someone else, for your community. as dark as it may seem even a tiny light may help bring others to you or merely help you see you’re not alone in the dark.

happy holidays.

As I type this a woman named Elaine is laying in a hospital bed, unresponsive, her kidneys are failing and she is intubated. I suppose I should call this person my mother but the tiny frail body I put into care six weeks ago wasn’t my mother and what’s left laying in a hospital bed now is even less of her.

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Unaccompanied Negro

July 7, 2016

for what it’s worth, every time I see flashing lights, I automatically slow and open the voice memo app on my phone. This is my reality. I am a six-foot plus, 320 pound, dreadlocked and tattooed black man. I am the ultimate suspect.

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all pain is relative

June 16, 2016

A year ago, I awoke in less pain that I had been in for the previous six and a half months. A year ago today was the first day after a surgery to correct my hip impingement. You would imagine that having a surgeon shaving off portions of bone would leave you in an excruciating amount of pain, you would be correct but as I’ve always stated, all pain is relative.

From January 1 to June 15, I spent my every waking moment in an incredible amount of pain. The kind of pain you could see in my face. Sitting, standing, moving, I hurt. In my first visit to the doctor after the surgery his comment to me was, I’m surprised you could function, most people with that amount of build-up in the joint are generally immobile. I dealt with the pain for six months with mostly OTC pain meds and the day after surgery coming off the minimum dosage of prescribed pain killers I immediately felt better.

Now it’s a year later and I still get twinges when I overdo it or as the weather changes but it’s better and I am truly grateful.

Once upon a soundscape

May 30, 2016

When we think about sound, we think about the score, dialog and effects working together to evoke a mood, the opening 11 minutes of Once Upon A Time In The West was one of the first films to simply use the ambient sound to evoke a mood.

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moderate Tuesday

March 1, 2016 — 1 Comment

I am sure my political views differ from some, possibly, a lot of you. At this point, that’s not important. What is important is that you do research and consider all your options. Sure you don’t like the other candidate, but can you articulate what your issues with them are, without resorting to ad hominem attacks? Or the three things you heard in your social media echo chamber? Are your candidate’s platform and promises realistic and/or executable? Are the people running locally, locally funded? Have the best interests of your community at heart?

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